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Bob Uecker
Ford C. Frick Recipient 2003 (Broadcaster)

Full Name: Robert George Uecker
Bats: Right Throws: Right
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 190 lbs.
Born: Jan 26, 1935 in Milwaukee, WI
Major League Debut: Apr 13, 1962

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CAREER BATTING STATISTICS
 BATTING
YEAR TEAM LG AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB K OBP SLG
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1967
Mil
Mil
StL
StL
Phi
Phi
Atl
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
.250
.250
.198
.228
.208
.171
.146
33
13
40
53
78
18
62
64
16
106
145
207
35
158
5
3
8
17
15
3
14
16
4
21
33
43
6
23
2
2
1
7
6
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
7
0
3
8
0
6
10
30
7
13
7
2
17
24
22
5
19
15
5
24
27
36
9
51
.324
.333
.315
.345
.279
.275
.236
.328
.375
.236
.317
.338
.229
.215
Totals AVG
.200
G
297
AB
731
R
65
H
146
2B
22
3B
0
HR
14
RBI
74
BB
96
K
167
OBP
.293
SLG
.287


 BATTINGBASERUNNINGMISC
YEAR TEAM LG HBP GDP TB IBB SH SF SB CS SB% AB/HR AB/K
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1967
Mil
Mil
StL
StL
Phi
Phi
Atl
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
3
1
1
1
8
1
3
21
6
25
46
70
8
34
0
0
0
1
6
1
4
0
0
0
1
4
1
2
0
0
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
-.---
-.---
.000
.000
-.---
-.---
.000
64.0
--.-
106.0
72.5
29.6
--.-
52.7
4.3
3.2
4.4
5.4
5.8
3.9
3.1
Totals HBP
3
GDP
18
TB
210
IBB
12
SH
8
SF
5
SB
0
CS
3
SB%
.000
AB/HR
52.2
AB/K
4.4


CAREER FIELDING STATISTICS
YEAR TEAM LG POS G Ch PO A E DP FPCT
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1967
Mil
Mil
StL
StL
Phi
Phi
Atl
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
24
6
40
49
76
17
59
113
24
224
273
407
74
321
101
21
201
240
368
67
281
10
2
20
29
33
5
31
2
1
3
4
6
2
9
4
1
2
1
7
0
3
0.982
0.958
0.987
0.985
0.985
0.973
0.972
Totals G
271
Ch
1436
PO
1279
A
130
E
27
DP
18
FPCT
0.981


The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum announced that legendary broadcaster Bob Uecker, who has called Milwaukee Brewers games for the last 33 years, including 24 as the lead announcer, has been named the 2003 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, presented annually for major contributions to baseball broadcasting.

"Bob Uecker, a national personality and fan favorite, is Baseball's funniest man, which has made him a household name not only in Milwaukee, but across America," said Hall of Fame President Dale Petroskey. "As a former major league player - a better one than he gives himself credit for - Bob has a deep knowledge of The Game. But it's his unique ability to make Baseball fun for everyone that sets him apart. He has made a lasting contribution to The Game. We're excited to honor him on Sunday, July 27, in Cooperstown."

Recognized five times as Wisconsin Sportscaster of the Year, Uecker joined the Brewers broadcasting tandem of Merle Harmon and Tom Collins in 1971. The illustrious "Voice of the Brewers," Uecker currently teams with Jim Powell on WTMJ radio in Milwaukee and the Brewers Radio Network, across the Midwest. The catcher-turned-broadcaster's self-effacing personality and eternally optimistic outlook made him an instant fan favorite. He has broadcast the World Series, League Championship Series and All-Star Game, as well as ABC's "Monday Night Baseball" in the 1970s and '80s.

A world-renowned comedic voice in broadcasting, Uecker earned his break after opening for Don Rickles at Al Hirt's nightclub in Atlanta one night in 1969. Hirt was so impressed with Uecker's dead-pan comedy that he arranged for him to appear on Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show." His instant success led to some 100 appearances with Carson, and appearances on ABC network television shows, including a starring role in "Mr. Belvedere" beginning in 1985. Uecker also hosted a pair of syndicated television shows, appeared in popular commercials, was type cast as a radio announcer in the films "Major League" and "Major League II" and authored the hilarious book entitled "Catcher in the Wry," which recounts his major league career. He was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 2001.

Uecker spent six seasons in the major leagues with the Braves, Cardinals and Phillies, hitting .200 with 14 HR and 74 RBI. He played on one World Series winner with the 1964 Cardinals.

The 68-year-old Uecker was a backup catcher who hit .200 in six seasons and played on the 1964 St. Louis team that won the World Series. But it was his humor that zoomed him to national prominence, and he turned his jokes into starring roles on television and the movies.

His line — "Must be in the front row!" — in a beer commercial where he gets shunted from the box seats to the bleachers became a catchphrase throughout the country.

In fact, at Miller Park where the Brewers play, the team sells "Uecker Seats" — high in the upper deck and obstructed, they go for $1.

His wry description on a wayward pitch — "Juuuust a bit outside!" — in the movie Major League is still often-repeated by announcers and fans at ballparks all over.

Despite his popularity, which led to a top role in the television show Mr. Belvedere and about 100 appearances on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show, Uecker is much different on the radio.

Uecker joined the Brewers' announcing team in 1971, and his broadcasts rarely include the standup humor that has made his a favorite on the banquet circuit. He's known for being self-effacing, rather than parading himself around as a celebrity.

"A couple of times, I've come out of the game early and heard him on the speaker in the clubhouse," Brewers' slugger Richie Sexson said before Thursday's exhibition game against Texas. "He's awesome, he's Mr. Baseball. He's the nicest person you'll ever meet."

Uecker will join former players Eddie Murray and Gary Carter and Dayton Daily News writer Hal McCoy at the ceremonies in Cooperstown, N.Y.

"He may not have had a Hall of Fame career on the field, but he certainly has had one in the booth," said Robin Yount, a Hall member who only played for the Brewers. "Throughout my career in Milwaukee, of all of the people I've known in the organization, he's one of my closest friends."

Uecker made it to the majors in 1962 with the Milwaukee Braves and batted .250 in 64 at-bats. It turned out he would never hit higher than that in any season.

Uecker went on to play with St. Louis, Philadelphia and Atlanta. He hit 14 career home runs with 74 RBI in 297 games.

"Career highlights? I had two," he once joked. "I got an intentional walk from Sandy Koufax and I got out of a rundown against the Mets."

The Frick Award, named for the former broadcaster who became commissioner, was picked by a seven-member panel of announcers that included Bob Costas, Joe Garagiola, Curt Gowdy, Ernie Harwell, Joe Morgan, Vin Scully and Curt Smith.

Uecker was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 2001 and is a five-time winner as Wisconsin Sportscaster of the Year.

He did network broadcasts of the World Series, league championship series and All-Star game in the 1970s and 1980s, and now is heard on WTMJ radio in Milwaukee and the Brewers' radio network.

Commissioner Bud Selig, whose family owns the Brewers, and Uecker go back a long time. Earlier this month during an exhibition broadcast, Uecker spotted Selig in the press box and pulled him into the booth with a hearty, "Hey, Buddy!"

"Bob and I have been friends for the past three decades and I'm sure Brewer and baseball fans everywhere share his joy and excitement over this well deserved honor. It is a great tribute to his wonderful career," Selig said.

Uecker got his big break off the field after opening for Don Rickles at Al Hirt's nightclub in Atlanta in 1969. That performance caught Hirt's attention, and the musician set him up to appear on Carson's show.

Over the years, Uecker's deadpan humor rarely strays far from baseball.

"The biggest thrill a ballplayer can have is when your son takes after you," he kidded. "That happened when my Bobby was in his championship Little League game. He really showed me something. Struck out three times. Made an error that lost the game. Parents were throwing things at our car and swearing at us as we drove off. Gosh, I was proud."